Orange Birds In Michigan

Orange Birds In Michigan

There are many types of birds in Michigan. Most people know about our state’s native songbirds such as robins, blue jays, cardinals, orioles, etc.

But there are also hundreds of other kinds of birds that call Michigan home. We’ll start by showing you some of the most common ones with specific orange coloring.

Orange Birds In Michigan

Then we’ll go into more detail about each type of bird.

There are many types of birds. You should know what kind of bird you are seeing before you start identifying it. Some birds are easy to recognize because they are colorful.

Others are difficult to tell apart because they are similar looking. Birds are also found in many habitats.

The birds with a lot of orange on them in Michigan include the Barn swallow, Baltimore oriole, Red-breast nuthatch, American Redstart, Eastern towhee, Cooper’s hawk, Brown thrasher, American kestrel, and the Wood thrush. 

There are many types of orange birds in North America: the Say’s Phoebee, the Hooded Oriole, and the Baltimore oriole are the most commonly seen.

Each type lives in a particular kind of environment. The Say’s phoebe is found in the desert and the dry open spaces.

The hooded oriole is found in the mixed forest and the Baltimore oriole is found in temperate forests.

Orange birds include male Hooded Orioles and Yellow-crowned Nightingale-Lories. Female birds have different colors than their mates.

Barn Swallow

Barn Swallow

Purple-blue birds are common across North America. Orange-bellied birds are seen in summer and fall.

Their color changes depending on the season. Their nests are built-in rafters on a porch, garage, or other buildings.

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

A male cardinal is a beautiful bird with a colorful head. He has a black hood and back, wings black with white patches, tail black with orange sides to base, bright orange underparts, and two white wing bars.

Female cardinals are very similar to males, but are more olive above, less dark, and have fewer wing bars.

Immature cardinals are olive above orangy-yellow on the breast, fading to yellow on the abdomen. Their two wing bars are faded.

Red-Breasted Nuthatch

Red-Breasted Nuthatch

Red-breasted nuthatches are active little birds that search for insects in crevices in the trunks of coniferous trees. They have a dark back and a light underside.

Their heads and necks are bright orange-cinnamon. They also have a black line through a whitish face. They are found almost everywhere in Michigan except in the south.

American Redstart

American Redstart

Warblers are small birds that flash colors while flying. Their tails are long and thin. Male Redstarts have bright orange patches on their breasts.

Female Redstarts are grayer than male Redstarts. Both sexes have bright orange patches on the sides of their breasts. Redstarts are summer visitors to Michigan.

Eastern Towhee

Eastern Towhee

The Rusty-colored Towhee is a common bird species in North America. It is a medium-sized bird with a short, thick bill.

Their backs are dark orange-brown, while their bellies are white. They have two long tails that are usually held straight up when flying.

They also have wings that are colored orange or rust-red on the backside.

They tend to be more active during the winter months because they need to eat more insects than during the warmer seasons.

Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper's Hawk

Crows are large birds that eat insects and other small creatures. These birds have red bands around their tails. Their heads are dark gray with a white stripe across them.

Adult crows have long beaks. They are found in urban areas as well as rural ones. They also live in trees.

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrasher

Brown Thrashers are very common birds. Their name comes from the fact that they thrash their wings when flying. They eat insects and seeds.

Their body is made up of mostly muscle. They make nests in trees or shrubs. They mate for life and lay eggs in the fall.

American Kestrel

American Kestrel

Falcons are small birds that hunt for insects and other small creatures. They sit on power lines and fly around looking for prey.

Female kestrels are barred with black on their wings and tails. Their heads show two facial stripes. Male kestrels have blue-gray backs and rufous tails.

They are found in open country and farm areas.

Wood Thrush

Wood Thrush

Wood Thrush is a small songbird found in both deciduous and coniferous forests. Their plumage consists of a short crest, a long tail, and a large head.

They are reddish-brown above and white below. They have a yellow line across their eyes. They eat insects, berries, seeds, and other fruits.

They spend most of their time on the ground, moving through the leaf litter.

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

These crested birds with yellow bands on the end of the tails are often found in flocked groups. They eat insects in summer, fruits, and berries in the other seasons.

Their bodies are brownish-gray above, with dark gray wing coverts and tails.

Their faces are black masks, and their wings are black. Their tails have white tips. Their bills have red spots on them.

Their legs are light gray. Their bellies are orange. Their backs are covered by broad rufous feathers.

Barn Swallow

Barn Swallow

Barn Swallows are often found eating insects over bodies of water, such as ponds or lakes.

Many people find that barn swallows will follow them while they’re mowing their lawn because the swallows enjoy feasting on the bugs kicked up when you use your lawnmower!

Barn swallows use mud as a material to make their nests. They usually nest under bridges, but also under eaves of barns and stables.

They prefer to build their nests on man-made buildings near open fields.

Final Thoughts

The birds mentioned here are only a few of the many kinds of birds that can be seen in Michigan.

There are hundreds of different types of birds that call this state home. Each one has its own unique characteristics and habits.

If you want to learn more about these birds, check out some great birding guides.

You’ll find information about where to see each species, what it eats, how to identify it, and much more. We hope you enjoyed learning about some of the birds that call Michigan home.