White Birds In Texas

White Birds In Texas

There are probably white birds in every state around the country. However, since Texas has a long southeaster coastline, there are a lot of sea-faring birds.

White Birds In Texas

In this list, we’re going to take a look at some of the common birds you might see if you’re visiting the Lone Star State.

If you’re near the coast, some of these birds are likely to be pretty common. Let’s take a look at them.

Great Egret

Great Egret

The great egret (Ardea Alba) also goes by the names large egret, or common egret. It’s a large white bird that can be found in the Americas, as well as Africa and parts of Asia and Europe.

It has four subspecies, and can reach heights of one meter. You may recognize this bird by its wingspan that reaches up to 1.7 meters (5.5 feet).

Great Blue Heron

Great Blue Heron

The great blue heron (Ardea Herodias) can be found in North America, Central America, and areas such as the Caribbean and the Galápagos Islands.

It grows to heights of 4.5 feet, and can have a wingspan of up to 6.6 feet.

You are likely to see one of these birds near a river, wading through the water and hunting for their next meal. This magnificent bird isn’t something you would forget quickly!

Tundra Swan

Tundra Swan

The tundra swan (Cygnus Columbianus) is a small swan. It is white with a black and yellow beak. These birds are known to spend most of their time in the remote parts of arctic North America.

They are known to be very protective of their nests, and will even defend their eggs and chicks against predators such as weasels, foxes, and even wolves.  

Trumpeter Swan

Trumpeter Swan

The trumpeter swan (Cygnus Buccinator) is one of the larger swan species. In fact, this is the heaviest flying bird in North America! Its wingspan can reach up to 8.2 feet, which is pretty massive.

You can recognize this bird by its large white body and black bill. You might see this graceful bird sitting on the water of lakes and other bodies. 

Cattle Egret

Cattle Egret

The cattle egret (Bubulcus Ibis) is a relatively small white bird with a tuft of yellow-brown plumes on its head and chest. They can often be found around livestock, as their name suggests.

These birds like feeding on the worms and insects that animals bring, and can be found in many areas of the world.

You might expect to see these birds in warm temperature zones, as well as the tropics and sub-tropics.

Black-Capped Petrel

Black-Capped Petrel

The black-capped petrel (Pterodroma Hasitata), or diablotin, is a gray-black and white seabird. It is small, with long wings and short legs.

These birds stay at sea for most of their lives, and only land on remote cliffs to breed from November to May.

You may recognize these birds for their pure white bellies and a strip of white plumage between black on the underside of their wings. 

Red-Billed Tropicbird

Red-Billed Tropicbird

The red-billed tropicbird (Phaethon Aethereus) is a beautiful bird you might be lucky enough to see. As their name suggests, these birds have red bills.

The rest of them are pure white with small amounts of black on their wings and a black line of plumage through their eyes.

Though very rarely seen from land, they spend most of their time on the sea or by rocky outcrops near the water. 

Western Gull

Western Gull

The western gull (Larus Occidentalis) is a common bird seen primarily on the west coast of the United States.

They have a white head and belly, with gray wings and a yellow bill. On their bottom bill is a single red dot, which makes them very recognizable.  

Glaucous-Winged Gull

Glaucous-Winged Gull

The glaucous-winged gull (Larus Glaucescens) is another large gull with a white head. This bird’s name refers to the gray marking on its wings, while the rest of it is predominantly white.

California Gull

California Gull

The California gull (Larus Californicus) is a medium sized bird found predominantly on the West Coast.

These birds have white heads, necks, and bellies, with gray wings. They are known to breed in colonies and can travel far inland from the sea.

Common Gull

Common Gull

The common gull (Larus Canus) is another medium-sized bird that may be spotted in parts of the United States. It also has a white head and belly, with gray wings.

It has a short beak, and resembles a dove or pigeon to many, rather than looking like a regular gull.

Elegant Tern

Elegant Tern

The elegant tern (Thalasseus Elegans)  is a beautiful seabird. It is white with light gray wings and a black stripe of plumage on the top of its head.

These birds have a long, orange beak, and long, pointed wings. They are sleek and very attractive birds, with medium-length, black legs that make them easily recognizable.

These birds might be seen in the Southern United States, and even Central and South America. 

Black-Legged Kittiwake

Black-Legged Kittiwake

The black-legged kittiwake (Rissa Tridactyla) is a bird that is part of the gull family. They are relatively small, black legged birds that spend a lot of time by sea.

Their name comes from their distinctive call, and they may be seen in colonies on the cliff sides in various parts of North America.

You may recognize these birds easily, as they have black-tipped wings. The young have a black “W” across their backs and wings, as well as a black collar around their neck and a black band around the tail.

Final Thoughts

Hopefully this list helped you identify that bird you saw! If you didn’t come here for that, then hopefully you learned a little more about the white birds that you might come across when you’re in Texas.

Of course, this is not a definitive list of all white birds you could see, since many birds will cross borders and move throughout the year.

However, these are a few that you should come across at one point or another. 

Good luck with that bird you saw! Keep those binoculars ready.